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February, 2019

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Vulnerability Exposes Location Of Thousands Of Malware C&C Servers

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Source:: PacketStorm

San Francisco’s outrageous rent hits a new peak of $3,690, highest in the US – CNET

The median price for a one bedroom apartment hit that new high before expected IPOs of Airbnb, Uber and Lyft this year. …read more

Source:: CNet

Anti-Cheat Software Causing Big Problems For Windows 10 Previews

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The Windows 10 Insider Preview Slow Ring — the beta track that’s meant to receive only those builds that are free from any known serious problems — hasn’t received an update for months. While the fast ring is currently testing previews of the April 2019 release, codenamed 19H1, and the even-faster skip-ahead ring is testing previews not of the October 2019 release, 19H2, but of the April 2020 release, 20H1, the Slow Ring is yet to receive a single 19H1 build. This has prompted some concern among insiders that perhaps the ring has been forgotten about, and it has even caused a few complaints from companies that are using the Windows Insider for Business program to validate new Windows releases before their launch. Without Slow Ring builds to test, there’s nothing to validate, meaning that they’ll have to delay deployment of 19H1 once it ships.

Microsoft’s Dona Sarkar, chief of the Windows Insider program, explained yesterday what the problem is, and in many ways it’s a throwback to Windows’ past, before the days of DEP and ASLR and PatchGuard and all the other measures Microsoft has implemented to harden Windows against malicious software: the build is crashing when some unspecified common anti-cheat software is used. Sarkar’s tweet says that the software causes a GSOD, for Green Screen of Death; the traditional and disappointingly familiar Blue Screen of Death, denoting that Windows has suffered a fatal error, is colored green for preview releases so they can be distinguished at a glance from crashes of stable builds. Fast ring builds have the same GSOD issue, and indeed, it has been listed on their known issues list for many months. Sarkar says that the fix must come from the third-party company that developed the anti-cheat software. In an update, Ars Technica’s Peter Bright says Microsoft has pushed a build to the Slow Ring, number 18342.8, but the GSOD issue remains. “To avoid crashing machines, the build won’t be offered to any system that has the offending anti-cheat software installed,” Bright writes. “It’s not clear why this approach could not have been used months ago.”

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of this story at Slashdot.

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Source:: Slashdot

Turkish Group Using Phishing Emails to Hijack Popular Instagram Profiles

In some cases, attackers have demanded ransom, nude photos/videos of victims in exchange for stolen account, Trend Micro says. …read more

Source:: DarkReading

Toyota, Carmera will create HD maps for self-driving cars using autobrake cameras – Roadshow

The cameras would be part of a push to speed up HD mapping for urban and local roads. …read more

Source:: CNet

Teardown Of A Luxury Bluetooth Nightlight

If you had asked us yesterday what peak nightlight technology looked like, we might have said one of those LED panels that you stick in the outlet. At least it beats one of those little wimpy light bulbs behind the seashell, anyway. But after looking at a detailed teardown of the “Glow Light” from Casper, we’ve learned a lot about the modern nightlight. Such as the fact that there are adults who not only sleep with nightlights, but are willing to pay $89 USD for one.

But more importantly, as [Tyler Mincey] demonstrates in his excellent look inside one of these high-end nightlights, they are gorgeous pieces of engineering. Even if a nightlight next to the bed has long since gone the way of pajamas with feet on them for you personally, we think you’ll be impressed just how much technology has gone into these softly glowing gadgets.

On the outside they might look like marshmallows, but the insides look far more like what you’d expect from an expensive piece of consumer gear. It’s based on the Nordic nRF52832 Bluetooth SoC which is becoming an increasingly common sight in consumer gadgets, and uses an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to detect when it’s moved or twisted and adjusts the light output accordingly. If you’ve got the disposable income for two of these things, they’ll even synchronize so that twisting one will dim its counterpart.

The teardown that [Tyler] did on the Glow Light is quite frankly one of the best we’ve ever seen, and while it might be a bit light on the gritty technical details, it more than makes up for that with the fantastic pictures that are about as close to actual hardware porn as you can get. The only question we have now is, how long until a hacker replicates this design with a 3D printed enclosure and an ESP?

[Thanks to Adrian for the tip.]

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Source:: Hackaday

YouTube says there’s ‘no evidence’ of videos promoting Momo Challenge – CNET

The alleged challenge pushes self-harm and has prompted warnings from police and schools. …read more

Source:: CNet

US music fans throw more money at vinyl, CDs than iTunes downloads now – CNET

Streaming is king though, bringing in 75 percent of the US recording industry’s revenue. …read more

Source:: CNet

US Companies Put Record Number of Robots To Work in 2018

U.S. companies installed more robots last year than ever before, as cheaper and more flexible machines put them within reach of businesses of all sizes and in more corners of the economy beyond their traditional foothold in car plants. From a report: Shipments hit 28,478, nearly 16 percent more than in 2017, according to data seen by Reuters that was set for release on Thursday by the Association for Advancing Automation, an industry group based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Shipments increased in every sector the group tracks, except automotive, where carmakers cut back after finishing a major round of tooling up for new truck models.

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Source:: Slashdot

YouTube to disable comments on videos featuring minors after child safety fears – CNET

But the company will leave comments on for a “small number” of creators who are minors. …read more

Source:: CNet

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