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June, 2019

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Researchers Claim Robust ‘Universal Computer Memory’ Breakthrough

Lancaster University has announced a “universal computer memory” breakthrough combining the fast, low-energy storage of DRAM memory with the robustness of flash memory. They’re now envisioning ultra-low energy consumption computers which would never need to boot up — and can “instantaneously and imperceptibly” slip into an energy-saving sleep mode.
Long-time Slashdot reader Hrrrg pointed us to this announcement:
A U.S. patent has been awarded for the electronic memory device with another patent pending, while several companies have expressed an interest or are actively involved in the research. The inventors of the device used quantum mechanics to solve the dilemma of choosing between stable, long-term data storage and low-energy writing and erasing… [Specifically, “by exploiting the quantum-mechanical properties of an asymmetric triple resonant-tunnelling barrier.”]

Physics Professor Manus Hayne of Lancaster University said, “Our device has an intrinsic data storage time that is predicted to exceed the age of the Universe, yet it can record or delete data using 100 times less energy than DRAM.”
The announcement predicts the technology could reduce peak power consumption in data centers by 20%.

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Source:: Slashdot

Former Equifax CIO Sentenced to 4 Months in Prison for Insider Training

An anonymous reader quotes CNET:
A former Equifax executive who sold his stock in the consumer credit reporting firm before it announced a massive data breach has been sentenced to four months in federal prison for insider trading. Jun Ying, former chief information officer for the company’s US Information Solutions, was also ordered to pay about $117,000 in restitution and a $55,000 fine, the US Attorney’s Office said Thursday… Ying sold all his shares in Equifax, making more than $950,000. Ying’s insider trading happened 10 days before Equifax publicly announced its breach.
Ying, 44, is the second Equifax employee convicted of insider trading related to the data breach. Sudhakar Reddy Bonthu, a former Equifax software development manager, pleaded guilty in 2018 to using the insider information to make more than $75,000 on the stock market. Bonthu was ordered to serve eight months home confinement, pay a $50,000 fine and forfeit the proceeds from the stock sale.

In announcing the sentence, U.S. Attorney Byung J. Pak said that Ying had “thought of his own financial gain before the millions of people exposed in this data breach even knew they were victims.”

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Source:: Slashdot

Extracting Power From USB Type C

For the last decade or so, we’ve been powering and charging our portable devices with USB. It’s a system that works; you charge batteries with DC, and you don’t want to have a wall wart for every device, so just grab a USB hub and charge your phone and you headphones or what have you. Now, though, we have USB Type C, with Power Delivery. Theoretically, we can pull a hundred Watts over a USB cable. What if we could tap into that with screw terminals?

That’s the idea behind [Jakob]’s entry to the Hackaday Prize. It’s a USB 3.1 Type C to Type A adapter, but it also has the neat little bonus of adding screw terminals. Think of it as jumper cables for your laptop or phone, but don’t actually do that.

[Jakob]’s board consists of a USB Type C receptacle on one end, and a Type A plug on the other, while in between those two sockets is an STM32G0 microcontroller that handles the power negotiation and PD protocol. This gives the USB Type C port dual role port (DRP) capability, so the power connection can go both ways. Add in a screw terminal, and you can theoretically get 20 Volts at 5 Amps through a pair of wires. Have fun with that.

Right now, [Jakob] has all the files in a Gitlab with the schematic and layout available here. It’s an interesting project that has tons of applications of USB hackery, and more than enough power to do some really fun stuff.

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Source:: Hackaday

Leaked Internal Intel Memo Acknowledges ‘Resurgent’, ‘Formidable’ AMD

Slashdot reader MojoKid writes:

AMD announced its 3rd Gen Ryzen 3000 series processors at Computex earlier this month and the company’s Zen 2 architecture is promised to bring single threaded performance parity with Intel but exceedingly better multithreaded throughput in content creation and other high-end workloads.

Intel has obviously taken notice of AMD’s Zen 2 advancements and nowhere is its renewed keen focus more evident than in an internal memo that just leaked out to public venues. The memo was originally posted on Intel’s internal “Circuit News” employee portal and it’s quite revealing. The memo, which is entitled, “AMD competitive profile: Where we go toe-to-toe, why they are resurgent, which chips of ours beat theirs”, is a surprisingly frank look at how AMD has managed to get the best of Intel, at least currently, and how the company should manage this renewed or “resurgent” competitive threat.
What’s most surprising about the memo, which was penned by Circuit News Managing Editor Walden Kirsch, is how flattering it is in general to AMD, pointing out that it was the best-performing stock on the S&P 500 for 2018. In terms of Zen 2 and AMD’s Ryzen 3000 series, the author notes, “Intel 9th Gen Core processors are likely to lead AMD’s Ryzen-based products on lightly threaded productivity benchmarks as well as many gaming benchmarks,” Kirsch writes in the memo. “For multi-threaded workloads, such as heavy content creation workloads, AMD’s Matisse is expected to lead.” All in, the internal memo is a rather insightful and well-reasoned look at the threat that AMD poses to Intel and how the company might respond.

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Source:: Slashdot

Fortnite season 9, week 8 challenges and where to visit 3 clocks – CNET

Tick tock. Time is running out for this season. …read more

Source:: CNet

Former Equifax exec gets 4 months in prison for insider trading after breach – CNET

Former CIO sold all his shares in the company 10 days before the breach was publicly revealed. …read more

Source:: CNet

Make The Product By Hacking The Catalogue

We’ve all had that moment of seeing a product that’s an object of desire, only to realize that it’s a little beyond our means. Many of us in this community resolve to build our own, indeed these pages are full of projects that began in this way. But few of us have the audacity of [vcch], who was so taken with the QLockTwo expensive designer word clock that they built their own using the facsimile of its face on the front of QLock’s own catalogue. The claim is that this isn’t an unauthorized copy as such because no clock has been copied — as far as we’re aware there’s nothing against taking the scissors to a piece of promotional literature, and it certainly differs from the usual word clocks we’ve seen.

So how has this masterpiece of knock-off engineering been performed? The catalog cover has a high-quality cut-out rendition of the clock face, and the pages behind are thick enough to conceal an addressable LED. By cutting slots through the pages enough space is created for strips of LEDs, which are then hooked up to a Wemos D1 that runs the show. The software is provided, et voila! A faithful facsimile of the original QLockTwo, in part produced by QLock themselves. We applaud the ingenuity involved, but like [vcch] we’d say that if you like the QLockTwo then perhaps you’d like to consider buying one.

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Source:: Hackaday

Prime Day 2019 starts July 15 — these are the best deals available so far – CNET

Prime Day will offer over 1 million deals, but some good ones can be had right now. Here’s everything you need to know about the event, including money-saving tips and tricks. …read more

Source:: CNet

5G battle royale: Verizon vs. AT&T vs. T-Mobile vs. Sprint – CNET

We tests 5G speeds on all four major US carriers. Here’s what happened. …read more

Source:: CNet

Bulgarian IT expert arrested after demoing vulnerability in kindergarten software

Vulnerability allowed him to download data of over 235,000 Bulgarian citizens. …read more

Source:: ZDNet

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